Book Promotion, Don't Call Me Kit Kat

Don’t Call Me Kit Kat is just $.99 for a limited time!

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Available only on AMAZON.

*Sale ends on 7/27.

Description:

Junior high is where things really start to happen. Cliques form and break apart. Couples are made and destroyed. And a reputation is solidified that you won’t ever be able to escape. Everything you do and say, and everyone you spend your time with, matters.

Katie Mills knows that. She gets it. That’s why she tried so hard to get in with the cool girls at school. And why she was so devastated when those efforts found her detained for shoplifting and laughed out of cheer squad tryouts.

But Katie has more to worry about than just fitting in. Her parents are divorced and always fighting. Her sister never has time for her. And her friends all seem to be drifting apart. Even worse? The boy she has a crush on is dating the mean girl at school.

Everything is a mess, and Katie doesn’t feel like she has control over any of it. Certainly not over her weight, which has always topped out at slightly pudgier than normal—at least, according to her mother.

So when she happens to catch one of the popular girls throwing up in the bathroom one day, it sparks an idea. A match that quickly engulfs her life in flames.

Is there any going back once she gets started down this path?

And would she even want to if she could?

Still not sure if this is the book for you? Visit Goodreads to find out what other readers had to say about Don’t Call Me Kit Kat.

Book Reviews

Book Review – Mine: A Love Story by Scott Prussing

I purchased Mine: A Love Story without knowing anything about it because the cover appealed to me. I had recently finished reading You by Caroline Kepnes, so for some reason, I thought this book might be similar. (Deranged person obsesses over someone after one date–something like that.) Turns out, this book is a young adult novel about a young woman and the new relationships she develops during her first year in college. She makes some nice, reliable girlfriends, but runs into some trouble when it comes to the guys (one in particular, rather). As I read this book, I constantly felt like I was waiting for something to happen, and for the most part, nothing I thought was going to happen happened. And nothing particularly dramatic occurred either, which isn’t a bad thing, but I tend to enjoy over-the-top scandal and gut-wrenching heartache.

Memorable Quote:

“A girl’s figure is the one place where B’s or C’s are way better than A’s.”

This is a good, clean YA read with A LOT of references to Taylor Swift. In my opinion, it would be most appropriate for a high schooler.

GOODREADS

AMAZON

Book Reviews

Book Review: More than a Moment by Kristin Albright

More than a Moment starts out with Julia’s boyfriend (Tyler) abruptly breaking up with her just before their senior year in high school. As if that isn’t enough, Julia is also a bit on the outs with her friends after being laid up with a horseback riding injury over the summer, and one of her so-called best friends appears to have grown much closer to Tyler than normal. Luckily, she strikes up a friendship with Lucas (a classmate and immigrant farmhand who works for Tyler’s parents) and, in doing so, learns a lot about true friendship, love, following your heart and standing up for what you believe in.

“For anyone who has ever wanted more time.”

I suspected from the opening line that this book would touch my heart, and I was right. However, I wasn’t expecting to feel so many different emotions—from sadness, anger and anticipation to embarrassment for the characters and relief. All a result of the themes covered in this lovely YA novel: friendship, peer pressure, bullying, stereotypes, racism, immigration, young love and romance.

Aside from the range of emotions I felt while reading, I loved the realistic interactions between the characters, all of the interesting information about horses, and the way Albright tackles the topic of illegal immigration. This is the first fictional book for teens I’ve encountered that highlights several current points related to the issue, all of which are seamlessly woven into the storyline so as not to make the book seem like a lesson in sociology or politics.

Two final things that really tugged at my heart strings were the romance between Julia and Lucas, and Albright’s focus on the significance of blinks (and all that can occur with just one) throughout the story. Here are some of my favorite romance- and blink-related quotes:

“Maybe that’s what life is—one giant series of blinks. The problem is you never know which ones will become your story until after they pass. It can make you want to squeeze your eyes shut with fear, never to blink again, or flutter your eyelashes like crazy, just to see what’s ahead.”

“But there’s no rewind and no fast-forward—just blink after unexpected blink. It doesn’t seem fair how fast the good blinks seem to pass us by.”

“His eyes sparkled like a guy who hadn’t had a bad blink day in a long time.”

“I stared at our fingers as they intertwined with one another—a zigzag of caramel and cream.”

“So, in a perfect world we’d say lots of hellos and goodbyes?” I teased. “Millions—all back to back—so we’d never be apart.”

“There are as many little stories in you as stars in the sky,’ he sighed, “and I want to know them all.”

If you’re looking for a clean YA read with serious everyday themes, then I highly recommend this one.

GOODREADS

AMAZON